A Story About Our Medical System

I have to get my decks power washed and stained.  The man who is doing the job, very nice, friendly, talkative, shared the fact that last year, he had a major heart attack.  I asked if I could share his story and this is it:

“I am 42 years old.  Now I don’t like doctors and I don’t like hospitals.  So something has to feel really wrong for me to even consider either.  I was working on a job, it was around Christmas last year, three days before Christmas to be exact.  I started to feel pretty terrible.  I had been having some chest pains on and off, but, you know, you don’t really think that it might be a heart attack.  Heck, I’m only 42 years old, so….But that day, I was really feeling a lot of pain.  I decided to go home.  I called my wife and told her that she needed to call an ambulance.  When I got home, the ambulance had not arrived yet.  She gave me aspirin.  It was winter.  It was cold.  They came and I told them that I thought I was having a heart attack.  They looked at me and replied, “Nah. Can’t be.  You are too young.  You are still standing up.  We’ll take your blood count.”  Apparently the blood counts were off the charts, causing the orderlies to jump into high gear.

They told “Jack” to get into the ambulance.  They had called ahead for a helicopter to come to the local hospital because his counts were so high.  They had called the destination hospital, alerting that this patient needed immediate attention.  By this time, “Jack” was shaking with cold.  The orderlies told him they would keep him warm in the ambulance.   “I kept grabbing at more and more blankets.  I just could not warm up.”

Off he went in the helicopter.  Yet when he arrived at the destination hospital, he ended up waiting up to two and a half hours before he went into surgery.  His wife, who drove home from the local hospital to get supplies (they had a baby), arrived forty five minutes after her husband did and helped finish the check in.   He had still not been seen by a doctor.

It turned out that one of the arteries was blocked 95%.  They put a stint in.  The next day, he was ravenous and ready to leave the hospital.  They only provided a menu for a heart patient, which, as one can imagine, was pretty light fare.  ”I told them that I needed to eat something and if they were not going to feed me, I would get up and leave and go get some real food.”  The doctor relented and he was able to eat a hearty (no pun intended) breakfast.

“I really wanted to spend Christmas at home with my family.  The doctors told me, ‘absolutely not!  You need to heal from the surgery.’  I replied that the way I was going to heal was to be with my family.  Thankfully, they did release me on Christmas day.”

He was given a slew of medications to take, including blood thinners and Statins.  He was supposed to go back for a re-check three months after the surgery.  ”I missed that appointment, but finally got back last week.  They found that my heart had recovered 99% of its abilities.  They were totally amazed since they said  this was very unusual.  But they also told me that my cholesterol was still too high and so they put me on a stronger Statin, Lipitor.”

Apparently, they are suggesting that he only do this for a year.  They will re-test in December to see whether he needs to continue.

Jack continued: “The doctor gave me a coupon for one of the  medications.  This medication costs $280 a bottle and the doctor told me, what with the fact that I work for myself, that if this was too cost-prohibitive, he would write me a prescription for a different medication.  Turned out that bottle cost $18.  I chose the medication that cost $18.”

“Now I’m not saying I am hundred percent and I don’t feel like I used to.  I have made some adjustments and I have slowed down, but I wonder where I would be had I not taken some initiative.”

One could say that “Jack” is a miracle story.  One could even conclude that had he not been tended at the hospital, he might not have been telling me his story.  On the other hand, where would “Jack” be if he had stayed in the hospital, under doctor’s advisement, eating “heart-healthy” meals for X amount of days?  What about the fact that there are two drugs out there that apparently have the same effects: one for $280 and the other for $18, and why did the doctor not suggest the latter in the first place?  And as for Lipitor, “don’t get me started!” [a bow to Billy Chrystal]  The side effects of this drug should be enough to prevent anyone from even considering ingesting this bit of poison.  But most people who are given it, take it, no questions asked.  Why?  The label says: potential side effects.

In conclusion…Some of the story shows our medical system at its best and some of the story shows areas that our medical system needs an overhaul.

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